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Thread: Engine build suggestions and opinions

  1. #151

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    Nice parts follow through Wiggsy. Should make for a nice street truck with more energy than the original.

  2. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by arro222 View Post
    Nice parts follow through Wiggsy. Should make for a nice street truck with more energy than the original.
    Thanks arro222, that was the plan I guess was an engine refresh with better stuff. It's our fun toy now to cruise around and check out the local car shows and meets with.

    I aimed too high at first with the 408 as I really liked my dad's stroker that he has in his '81 Malibu and I really wanted to have him build one with me but distance and old Father Time has made that rather difficult. My dad has been building street and Racing engines for 40 plus years, retired now but still dabbles in it for special builds. He's old school and I'm still amazed with his great wealth of knowledge

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  3. #153

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    Making the trip out to Whiplash Engine & Machine tomorrow with the remainder of parts to start assembly. Working on the M1 a little bit, smoothed out the ports is all nothing significant. Added some black paint to the casting letters and numbers.

    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

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  4. #154

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    So here's my nervous question:

    Do you think this will run and how bad?

    I ask because of the cam being installed, I was wondering how crappy do they run with no tunage.
    Last edited by Wiggsy72; 03-27-2017 at 05:31 AM.

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  5. #155





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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    Icon 4032 alloy, can't find them for Chrysler as they only have 2618 alloy.
    2618 is a better alloy than 4032 by the way.....
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  6. #156





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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    So here's my nervous question:

    Do you think this will run and how bad?

    I ask because of the cam being installed and the uncertainty of when I will get my first initial tune. I'm sure Ryan is busy but I have tried communications provide all the info on the engine build I can provide but I get nothing back, not so much as a "I got it, sit tight" nothing
    It will run, just run like poop at idle......
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  7. #157

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    Quote Originally Posted by slammedR/T View Post
    It will run, just run like poop at idle......
    Okay, thanks Chad

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  8. #158



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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    Okay, thanks Chad
    What's your target date for startup?


    Josh - 98 BLK RC - Mad Milkshake Maker
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  9. #159

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    Quote Originally Posted by madboy View Post
    What's your target date for startup?
    Last week in March but it's not set in stone.

  10. #160

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    Posting this AEM Wide Band to SCT X3 connection diagram for others to use. Hopefully it will help someone out
    [IMG][/IMG]

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  11. #161



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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    Last week in March but it's not set in stone.
    Just let him know your target date for Startup and if he doesn't contact you by then I will be happy to help rattle the cage for whatever that is worth.



    Josh - 98 BLK RC - Mad Milkshake Maker
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    01 SLVR RC - mad sexy - retired - then died
    99 IB RC - mad RT - gone to heaven..



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  12. #162

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    Engine assembly starts this week. I'll post up anything I get from the "Dude".

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  13. #163

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    So here's my nervous question:

    Do you think this will run and how bad?
    It'll run, but idle like poop.
    Last edited by Hatchman; 03-27-2017 at 11:29 PM.
    '03 Stampede Graphite Metallic Dakota R/T CC

    FRP tune, M1 2bbl, HiPoTek 52mm TB, K&N 14" Filter, Headers, Flowmaster duals

  14. #164

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    I 'm with you guys. My project has came to a stop and now I'm waiting....

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    Just got an email from Ryan. He asked for me to fill out a "Build Sheet" on the FRP website and he said he could get it out today. My bad on not reading the FAQ and not knowing thus never filling out the build sheet. If you haven't filled it out, look under the "SCT TUNING" tab drop down and there is a "SCT VEHICLE BUILD SHEET" page. Pretty easy and only takes a minute.

    Thanks, Ryan!
    '03 Stampede Graphite Metallic Dakota R/T CC

    FRP tune, M1 2bbl, HiPoTek 52mm TB, K&N 14" Filter, Headers, Flowmaster duals

  16. #166

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchman View Post
    Just got an email from Ryan. He asked for me to fill out a "Build Sheet" on the FRP website and he said he could get it out today. My bad on not reading the FAQ and not knowing thus never filling out the build sheet. If you haven't filled it out, look under the "SCT TUNING" tab drop down and there is a "SCT VEHICLE BUILD SHEET" page. Pretty easy and only takes a minute.

    Thanks, Ryan!
    Didn't know that is where the build sheet was located and I didn't see it jump out at me on my phone sized web browser. I did ask however for this build sheet.

    Now waiting to hear back on my machinist guy who became swamped and possibly sick from the cold going around these parts.


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  17. #167

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchman View Post
    Just got an email from Ryan. He asked for me to fill out a "Build Sheet" on the FRP website and he said he could get it out today. My bad on not reading the FAQ and not knowing thus never filling out the build sheet. If you haven't filled it out, look under the "SCT TUNING" tab drop down and there is a "SCT VEHICLE BUILD SHEET" page. Pretty easy and only takes a minute.

    Thanks, Ryan!
    Thanks Hman for this heads up.. Didn't realize the build sheet. Still not going to bother Ryan at this time since I haven't started yet. Will fill it out later but at least I'll know what to do when the time comes.
    Last edited by arro222; 03-26-2017 at 10:40 PM.

  18. #168

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    Engine assembly starting this week, he was sick last week. Crank is out for grind and then rotating assembly balancing. Should have some pics and some video later in the week.

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  19. #169

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    Jayson has started machine work on the block this week. In this link he's making the bushings for mounting the block on the horizontal boring machine https://instaliga.com/whiplashmachin...994_3289840730

    In this link he is grinding the con rods and caps while the block is on the horizontal boring machine https://instaliga.com/whiplashmachin...397_3289840730

    Today he got into the boring https://instaliga.com/whiplashmachin...497_3289840730

    Looks like a good block https://instaliga.com/whiplashmachin...827_3289840730

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  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    List of parts so far...

    * FRP Tuning SCT X3 Custom Tune Package
    * AEM 30-4110
    * BOSCH wideband A/F sensor 17025
    * HiPoTek 210XP 210/220 @110lsa .512 .512
    * HiPoTek Viper torque converter 2800 stall
    * EngineQuest bare heads CH318A
    * Harland Sharp Original Roller Rockers 1.6:1 S7306
    * Hughes Engines Intake Valves HUG 1038A 1.92"
    * Hughes Engines Exhaust Valves HUG 1048 1.62"
    * Hughes Engines Spring Kit HUG 1199
    * Comp Cams 4825-8 pushrods guide plates
    * Comp Cams 4542-16 Magnum rocker studs 3/8"
    * Mopar Magnum Valve Covers P5007617
    * EngineTech roller lifters L2167-4
    * Mopar Viton valve seals P5249661
    * Mopar timing chain & gear sets P5249267
    * Mopar Cast Valve Cover Grommets P5249642
    * Melling Oil Pump MEL-M72HV
    * Melling Oil pump pickup MEL-200S
    * Sealed Power brass freeze plugs 381-8010
    * Sealed Power full gasket set SLP-260-1723
    * Sealed Power MA series main bearing set 0.010" SLP-4999MA10
    * Sealed Power CP series con rod bearings 0.010" SLP-8-2130CP10
    * Sealed Power performance piston rings 4.030" SLP-E-908K30
    * Sealed Power hypereutectic pistons 4.030" SLP-H655CP75MM
    * BBK Throttle body twin 52mm 1722
    Just trying to learn hear...so I would like to know why you choose the sealed power hypereutectic pistons over say a wiseco pro trupistons that is forged?

  21. #171

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    Quote Originally Posted by redbank View Post
    Just trying to learn hear...so I would like to know why you choose the sealed power hypereutectic pistons over say a wiseco pro trupistons that is forged?
    Short answer is that this is a performance street engine build with many years of fun driving mileage. It is not a race engine that will be brken down and rebuilt every season.

    Long answer:
    "There are two common ways of making a piston.
    You can cast it in a mold, or you can forge it under extreme applied pressure in a forging press.
    *Note*, this says absolutely nothing about what material the piston is made from, it is only the METHOD used to shape the material into the shape of a piston.

    Now quite independent of HOW the piston shape is shaped, you then get to chose the type of aluminium alloy, and maybe heat treatment. There are two popular materials, pretty much pure aluminium, and aluminium very rich in silicon (sand !).

    O/k now the advantages and disadvantages.

    Cast pistons can be made absolutely any intricate shape, because after the molten metal has cooled solid, the multi piece mold can then be extracted from inside the piston. Very complicated slots, reinforcing ribs, oil holes and other complex features can readily be built in, and a piston can be designed to be both very light, and very strong where it needs to be made strong.

    Forged pistons are stamped out in one rapid and very violent operation, where a male punch is driven into a female die to form the entire piston shape. This always has the limitation that the punch needs to be subsequently withdrawn straight out of the die backwards, meaning the inside shape has to be designed both tapered and very simple and smooth in form.

    So cast pistons are almost always lighter in weight, and more intricate inside, and can be more cleverly designed.
    Forged pistons will almost always be heavier and always smooth inside, the extra metal usually adding more to weight than to strength. Some forgings are truly massive, and very very strong, but also quite heavy.

    Both methods can produce a perfectly usable piston, but if you either want something very light or very strong, one method may have some particular advantages over the other.

    Now the material choice boils down to two very different classes of material.

    Raw natural aluminium is soft, and it expands hugely with heat, but it is tough and bends before it breaks. The raw aluminium pistons in your top fuel dragster will take a hell of a battering. They will bend like a drink can or melt before they crack or shatter from detonation, these are true racing pistons. And they can be either forged or cast, but are usually forged.

    The bad news is the high thermal expansion, they must be fitted very loose and they rock and rattle in the bores when cold. They also wear very quickly because they are SOFT. These racing pistons are ideal for a very high output engine that is regularly stripped after only a few races and rebuilt, but very bad news in a long life street engine.

    Now the very high silicon hypereutectic pistons are very hard and brittle, have minimal thermal expansion, and can be fitted very tightly into the bores for good cold compression silent running and good oil control. They seal very well, and last a long time, and they are perfect for a long life road engine. These pistons can also be bought either cast or forged, but they have one unfortunate disadvantage.
    Being brittle, detonation will crack them quite easily. But if you can keep out of detonation, they would be the best choice for most of us here.

    So the most common types of pistons are:

    Cast hypereutectic, very light, very long wearing, seal very well, but prone to crack if detonation occurs. What most of the car manufacturers fit, they are excellent pistons.

    Cast aluminium pistons are just not made anymore, they have all the disadvantages and no advantage.

    Forged hypereutectic, both heavier and stronger, very long wearing, seal very well best choice for high performance on the street.

    Forged aluminium, heavy, very very strong, the toughest pistons you can buy for a real competition engine. They will rattle and wear fast and typically start burning oil after a few thousand road miles. But if you are building a 9,000 rpm six second car, you don't plan on expecting 150,000 miles between rebuilds, huh ?

    All the major piston manufacturers offer their forged pistons in BOTH types of material, and the clearance will tell you if they are the hard or soft material.
    Or put simply, "rubber" aluminium pistons for a race motor or "glass" hypereutectic pistons for your streeter.

    So there are two things, HOW the piston is made cast or forged.
    And WHAT alloy the piston is made from." - The Dude
    Last edited by Wiggsy72; 04-20-2017 at 07:09 PM.

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  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggsy72 View Post
    Short answer is that this is a performance street engine build with many years of fun driving mileage. It is not a race engine that will be brken down and rebuilt every season.

    Long answer:
    "There are two common ways of making a piston.
    You can cast it in a mold, or you can forge it under extreme applied pressure in a forging press.
    *Note*, this says absolutely nothing about what material the piston is made from, it is only the METHOD used to shape the material into the shape of a piston.

    Now quite independent of HOW the piston shape is shaped, you then get to chose the type of aluminium alloy, and maybe heat treatment. There are two popular materials, pretty much pure aluminium, and aluminium very rich in silicon (sand !).

    O/k now the advantages and disadvantages.

    Cast pistons can be made absolutely any intricate shape, because after the molten metal has cooled solid, the multi piece mold can then be extracted from inside the piston. Very complicated slots, reinforcing ribs, oil holes and other complex features can readily be built in, and a piston can be designed to be both very light, and very strong where it needs to be made strong.

    Forged pistons are stamped out in one rapid and very violent operation, where a male punch is driven into a female die to form the entire piston shape. This always has the limitation that the punch needs to be subsequently withdrawn straight out of the die backwards, meaning the inside shape has to be designed both tapered and very simple and smooth in form.

    So cast pistons are almost always lighter in weight, and more intricate inside, and can be more cleverly designed.
    Forged pistons will almost always be heavier and always smooth inside, the extra metal usually adding more to weight than to strength. Some forgings are truly massive, and very very strong, but also quite heavy.

    Both methods can produce a perfectly usable piston, but if you either want something very light or very strong, one method may have some particular advantages over the other.

    Now the material choice boils down to two very different classes of material.

    Raw natural aluminium is soft, and it expands hugely with heat, but it is tough and bends before it breaks. The raw aluminium pistons in your top fuel dragster will take a hell of a battering. They will bend like a drink can or melt before they crack or shatter from detonation, these are true racing pistons. And they can be either forged or cast, but are usually forged.

    The bad news is the high thermal expansion, they must be fitted very loose and they rock and rattle in the bores when cold. They also wear very quickly because they are SOFT. These racing pistons are ideal for a very high output engine that is regularly stripped after only a few races and rebuilt, but very bad news in a long life street engine.

    Now the very high silicon hypereutectic pistons are very hard and brittle, have minimal thermal expansion, and can be fitted very tightly into the bores for good cold compression silent running and good oil control. They seal very well, and last a long time, and they are perfect for a long life road engine. These pistons can also be bought either cast or forged, but they have one unfortunate disadvantage.
    Being brittle, detonation will crack them quite easily. But if you can keep out of detonation, they would be the best choice for most of us here.

    So the most common types of pistons are:

    Cast hypereutectic, very light, very long wearing, seal very well, but prone to crack if detonation occurs. What most of the car manufacturers fit, they are excellent pistons.

    Cast aluminium pistons are just not made anymore, they have all the disadvantages and no advantage.

    Forged hypereutectic, both heavier and stronger, very long wearing, seal very well best choice for high performance on the street.

    Forged aluminium, heavy, very very strong, the toughest pistons you can buy for a real competition engine. They will rattle and wear fast and typically start burning oil after a few thousand road miles. But if you are building a 9,000 rpm six second car, you don't plan on expecting 150,000 miles between rebuilds, huh ?

    All the major piston manufacturers offer their forged pistons in BOTH types of material, and the clearance will tell you if they are the hard or soft material.
    Or put simply, "rubber" aluminium pistons for a race motor or "glass" hypereutectic pistons for your streeter.

    So there are two things, HOW the piston is made cast or forged.
    And WHAT alloy the piston is made from." - The Dude
    good stuff.....thanks for the education lesson

  23. #173

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    Damn Wiggsy, a simple "because I want to" would have been sufficient.
    Just kidding. I like when people explain themselves with serious answers

    Project Maverick. I feel the need, the need for speed

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by BIGROB View Post
    Damn Wiggsy, a simple "because I want to" would have been sufficient.
    Just kidding. I like when people explain themselves with serious answers
    Never did I expect an answer like that but I am glad he did. I learned a lot with the "long" answer lol. Paying it forward with knowledge. That is what these forums are for. If we ever cross paths I will buy that man a beer. I just hope it's in the US because beer prices north of us are ridiculous.

  25. #175

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    Just wanted to share what my decision was based upon.

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